Massage Lakeland – Manual Lymphatic Drainage Treatment

Posted by on May 17, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

The Massage Center – Lakeland

5151 South Lakeland Drive, Suite 6 South Lakeland, FL 33813

License MM19307

(863) 248-8591

Massage Lakeland-Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD)

Perhaps the strangest kind of massage therapy offered in massage centers and spas is what is known as Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD). While it sounds more like an advanced medical procedure or surgical operation, MLD is actually an accessible form of massage therapy that helps to reduce the pain and swelling of the nodes of lymphatic system and thereby increase the wellness of the patient.  The Massage Center – Lakeland FL has specialists on staff to assist with every need.

But what exactly is the lymphatic system, and what does it inside our bodies? The lymphatic system is a collection of specialized vessels, nodes, and ducts located throughout the body. Its main function is to assist the greater immune system in defending us against pathogens. Lymphatic vessels transport a clear-white fluid called lymph, composed mostly of white-blood cells and chyle, a fatty fluid developed in the intestines. The lymph carries a substance called interstitial fluid, which may contain bacteria, biochemical wastes from metabolism, and other unwanted materials, from the crevices and creases of the body’s tissues to clumps of lymph tissue called lymph nodes, small bulbs that contain lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that kills foreign microbes. This is one reason that lymph nodes swell when we get sick. The lymph vessels also take this interstitial fluid back into the bloodstream. In all these ways, the lymphatic system is one of the first lines of defense against the harsh and world around and within us. It is like the body’s very own fluid filtration system.

Benefits of MLD Massage in Lakeland

Unlike the circulatory system, the lymphatic system has no mechanism like the heart to move lymph around the body. The transportation of the lymph is often slow and sporadic, depending on the contraction of surrounding smooth muscle tissue. This is where MLD can greatly benefit the individual. A trained massage therapist trained in performing MLD aims to do the following:

  • stimulate the lymphatic system by improving lymph circulation
  • expedite the removal of harmful pathogens and biochemical wastes
  • reduce swelling in the lymph nodes
  • reduce sympathetic nervous system response (often called the “fight-or-flight” response) to sickness or disease

While there are many specialized training programs offering certification for MLD like the Vodder or Földi School, each named after practitioners of MLD, most techniques include applying very gentle, rhythmic pressure to areas swollen with lymph so that the lymph can drain normally. Since swollen lymph nodes are often filled with undesirable materials, the increased flow and circulation of lymph may expedite the body’s healing process. MLD is often received by athletes, whose physical activities produce a large amount of metabolic waste, and patients of various diseases. Oncologists, medical professional specializing in cancer diagnosis and treatment, sometimes offer MLD to reduce the painful swelling of lymph nodes, known as Lymhpedema. The management of breast cancer, for example, seems particularly helped by regular MLD sessions.  Even for healthy individuals, an MLD might prove even more rejuvenating than traditional massage therapy since it can help the body get rid of waste and foreign microbes. Fortunately for patrons of The Massage Center, it offers to its clients its own modality of MLD, Treatment #10.

 

Sources:

 

Duman, Iltekin, et al. “The Efficacy of Manual Lymphatic Drainage Therapy in the Management of Limb Edema Secondary to Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy.” Rheumatology          International 29 (2009): 759-7623. ProQuest Central. Web. 15 May 2013.

 

Farabee, Michael. Online Biology Book. Avondale, Arizona: Estrella Mountain Community           College, 2007. E-book.   <http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/biobooktoc.html >

 

Huang, Tsai-Wei, et al. “Effects of Manual Lymphatic Drainage on Breast Cancer-related Lymphedema: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled   Trials.” World Journal of Surgical Oncology 11.15 (2013): 1-8. ProQuest Central. Web.    15 May 2013.

 

“Lymph System.” Medline Plus. U.S. National Library of Medicine and National Institute of        Health. Web. 15 May 2013.       <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002247.htm>

 

Molski, P., et al. “Patients with Venous Disease Benefit from Manual Lymphatic Drainage.”          International Oncology 28.2 (2009): 11-155. ProQuest Central. Web. 15 May 2013.

 

Vairo, Giampietro L., et al. “Systematic Review of Efficacy for Manual Lymphatic Drainage        Techniques in Sports Medicine in Sports Medicine Rehabilitation: An Evidence-Based     Practice Approach.” Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy 17.3 (2009): 80-89.          PubMed Central. Maney Publishing. Web. 15 May 2013.             <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2755111/>

 

The Massage Center – Lakeland

5151 South Lakeland Drive, Suite 6 South Lakeland, FL 33813

License MM19307

(863) 248-8591

Article submitted by: Dan Abella
Content Writer
The Massage Center